Featured image of Lullingstone Castle

The History of Lullingstone Castle

LocationLullingstone, Kent, England (Google Map Location)
Open for VisitorsYes (from 1st April 2022)
Owned byTom Hart Dyke
Official WebsiteLullingstone Castle and World Garden
Rooms AvailableNone

One of England’s oldest family estates, Lullingstone Castle, takes you back to the 2nd millennium when the Domesday was drafted. Located amidst 120 acres of the picturesque Kent countryside, the beautiful castle has been the abode of the Dyke family since 1497.

History

As written down in the Domesday Book, Lullingstone Castle was presented to Gregory de Rokesley, who served eight terms as Lord Mayor of London in 1279. It was handed over to the Rokesley family for a considerable time prior to being offered to the Peche family. The construction of the current castle began in 1497 under Sir John Peche, High Sheriff of Kent, succeeded by the (1509) joint Lord Deputy of Calais. The castle was graced by the presence of Henry VIII and Queen Anne during that time.

In 1543, the castle was presented to his nephew, Sir Percyval Hart, chief steward and knight harbinger to King Henry VIII, King Edward VI, Queen Mary I, and Queen Elizabeth I, after his marriage. He passed away in 1580, leaving the castle to his grandson, Sir Percival Hart. Later, the house was passed on to his great-grandson, one more Percival Hart, who was High Sheriff of Kent in 1706, who rebuilt the house and christened it as Lullingstone Castle. He had one daughter, Anne, who married Sir Thomas Dyke.

In 1934, the castle was offered to Kemp Town Brewery, who sold it off to Kent County Council in 1938. It was utilized by the Army during World War II.

The castle now is in possession and acts as the abode for the Hart Dyke family.

Architecture

Lullingstone Castle and Church
Lullingstone Castle and Church”, by Lawrence OP, is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The frontal part of Lullingstone Castle was built for the brief visit of Queen Anne. The eighteenth-century exterior just conceals the Tudor heart of the castle. The entry lobby leads to an extraordinary corridor featuring a grand flight of stairs. Past this is the dining area and library, regaling in the elegant style of Queen Anne but reminiscent of Tudor’s appeal.

The state drawing-room is at the highest point of the staircase, a great barrel-vaulted chamber with an impeccably detailed mortar roof, highlighting conventional strapwork plans and customary medallions. The state bedroom lies past this, with the bed where Anne was rumoured to have dozed off in.

Additionally, on the primary floor, the highest point of the staircase is a presentation of the historical backdrop of yard tennis. Sir William Hart Dyke and Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) drew up the principal rules of the game.

The interior of the castle does not exude style but is rather agreeable and polite. This is a family home, not a gallery masterpiece, and the family angle radiates through. All things considered, the state drawing-room, with its brilliantly lavish roof, would look perfect in any English treasure-house.

Music Video Features

  • Music Video of A Hundred Years of Winter by The Steps– The music video captures scenes with the castle in the background, flying shots of the castle ground, which is the home of the World Garden, built by Tom Hart Dyke, and overlooking the lake.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you go inside Lullingstone Castle?

Yes. As the house is home to the Dyke family, not every room is available to the visitors. The rooms that are open to the common public are truly splendid, designed with old-fashioned furnishings, brilliant works of art, and traditional artefacts.

Can you get married at Lullingstone Castle?

A select few are permitted to get married and celebrate in Lullingstone Castle. The castle is known for being the place where lavish weddings take place.

Have you visited this castle before? If yes, why not share some beautiful pictures with us!
You can email us your pictures of the castle at castrumtocastle@gmail.com. Please use the name of the castle in the subject line.
Also, don’t forget to mention your name and social media profile link if you want the credits!

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